Population-Poverty Linkages and Health Consequences Understanding Global Social group Inequalities

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Sanghmitra Sheel Acharya
http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6488-4181

Abstract

Population dynamics and determinants of poverty are associated in a way that affects access to resources which influence health. The popular belief often is that population growth causes problems including poverty.  Scientific arguments, however, have fairy well established that it is the nature of development, which is important to ensures availability, access and utilization of resources, services and opportunities for different population groups. Population growth is an insufficient explanation for denial of access to resources because development disparities across globe render different populations exposed to vulnerabilities of varied kinds. Disparities in health between different social groups are the function of unequal way in which the determinants of health are distributed in society. Beyond its effects on health, inequality has far reaching consequences on social trust and cohesion affecting social institutions; and also on  mortality and health outcomes. Factors such as income, employment status, housing, education, social position, and social exclusion have direct and indirect bearings on health over lifetimes. In many countries there is evidence of a social gradient in health, with those in more advantaged positions enjoying generally better health and lower mortality. In India, caste is an important axes on which discrimination and denial occurs causing poor health outcome. In term of income and social indicators, India is one of the most unequal countries in the world.  The present paper endeavours to understand the determinants of disparity among population groups across countries which influence access to health care with special reference to India.


 


 

Article Details

How to Cite
Acharya, S. (2020). Population-Poverty Linkages and Health Consequences. CASTE / A Global Journal on Social Exclusion, 1(1), 29-50. https://doi.org/10.26812/caste.v1i1.142
Section
Research Articles